That said, the at-home job niche has been challenging to navigate for many job seekers because of the prevalence of job search scams. At FlexJobs, we know finding legitimate work-from-home jobs isn’t easy. That’s why we exist! Our team researches and vets every job posting that’s on our site to ensure legitimacy. Check out these companies that hire for legitimate work-from-home jobs.
Not to get too personal right off the bat, but put some clothes on. It’s tempting, I know, to roll out of bed and blob over to your laptop in your pajamas. Or maybe not even get out of bed in the first place? It’s a trap. If you’re dressed for sleep, it’s going to be a lot harder to get your brain up to a canter, much less a gallop. (In this metaphor your brain is a horse, go with it.) More important, though, if you don’t get up, take a shower, brush your teeth, get dressed—whatever your morning routine entails when you actually do go into the office—you’re breaking the cardinal rule of working from home: Set boundaries.
So! If your employer has asked you to stay home, here are some strategies for keeping it together, gleaned from someone who’s been doing it since “slack” was mostly a verb. Note: This is not a guide to responsible prepping, washing your hands, or scavenging Purell, although by all means do those things. It's mostly a reminder to draw bright lines between work and the rest of your life. It also draws on my own experience, so it hopefully goes without saying that your mileage may vary.
I don’t have a great solution for this. Quitting out of Slack—or whatever your workplace uses—is probably a good start. People are less likely to ping you if your circle’s not green. Or maybe find a gym class or extracurricular that you have to leave the house for at a certain time every day and let that be your stopping point? In some ways it’s like figuring out how to ditch your shadow.
So! If your employer has asked you to stay home, here are some strategies for keeping it together, gleaned from someone who’s been doing it since “slack” was mostly a verb. Note: This is not a guide to responsible prepping, washing your hands, or scavenging Purell, although by all means do those things. It's mostly a reminder to draw bright lines between work and the rest of your life. It also draws on my own experience, so it hopefully goes without saying that your mileage may vary.
Every few days I spend at least a few hours at a coffee shop. It’s a change of scenery, a good excuse to get some fresh air, and provides a tiny bit of human interaction that Slack conversations and Zoom meetings do not. Should that no longer be feasible for coronavirus reasons, at the very least see if you can walk around the block a couple of times a day. There’s no water cooler when you work from home, no snack table, no meetings down the block. It’s easy to stay locked in position all day. Don’t do it! Sitting is terrible for your health, and mind-numbing when you’re staring at the same wall or window all day.
On the one hand, working remotely for several years has probably made me a little paranoid. On the other hand, your colleagues are all talking about you behind your back. Kidding! (Mostly.) In truth, the bigger concern with working remotely is that they'll forget you're there at all. You inevitably miss the impromptu meetings and side conversations that spin little ideas into big projects. Which is mostly OK—you'll get caught up, especially in an environment when most people are working from home.
Creating content and engaging with fans and customers is a time-consuming task that many businesses don’t have the bandwidth to do in-house. As a result, they prefer to outsource the task. While some companies do have full-time in-house social media managers, it’s often cheaper to hire a part-time remote worker for this role. This opens up positions for work-from-home freelancers.
Where you actually set up shop is entirely up to you. Maybe you have a dedicated office space with a desktop and a view. Sounds nice. If you don’t, that’s also fine; I usually work on my laptop at a kitchen counter. The point here is to clearly define the part of your house where work happens. That makes it more likely that you’ll actually get things done when you’re there, but just as importantly might help you disconnect when you’re not. Remember that when you work from home you’re always at home—but you’re also always at work. At all costs, you should avoid turning your entire house or apartment into an amorphous space where you’re always on the clock but also kind of not. It’s no way to live. (Full-time remote workers take note: You can also write off a few hundred square feet of in-home office space on your tax return.)
You can get started with freelance writing by taking a course like Holly Johnson’s Earn More Writing that teaches you how to set your rates and land clients. Make sure you have a portfolio of writing samples to show to prospective clients. If you’re new to freelancing and have a blog, you can use the original blog content you’ve written until you have client work to showcase.

As is typically the case with remote positions, you will need to have a dedicated workspace in your home, and a PC with a high-speed Internet connection. You may also need to purchase specific equipment, which could include a headset, flash drive, or a dual monitor. You must also be a “people person”, and will be required to be available seven days a week.
Kelly Services is one of the most popular employment agencies in the US. Best known for temporary jobs, the company began operations in 1946, and now offers positions in more than 30 countries around the world. It has more than 500,000 workers around the globe. Ranked Number 8 on the FlexJobs 2019 list, Kelly Services has moved up two notches for 2020.
If you were not able to find luck with the list of jobs I have presented above, visit FlexJobs. This job site has been rated by the Better Business Bureau with an A+. They even provide a money-back guarantee in case you are not satisfied with how they deliver their service. FlexJobs assures that every single work posted is hand-screened to check its legitimacy. This is a fantastic method to find legit home-based jobs without the worries of handling scams.
#48 – Stitch Fix – Read review – If you are a fashionista with a creative eye, try Stitch Fix a company that allows you to share fashion tips with clients on the site. For work at home stylist, Stitch Fix offers a $16+ an hour pay. As a requirement, you must be 18 years of age or more and be ready to attend their off-site training before starting the job.

This is an amazing list of work at home jobs! I am currently working on a home business but it would be nice if I could land a work at home job from your list above to introduce a little more freedom in my life and have some more time for working on my home business. I have already went through the Working Solutions process and hope all goes well but I won’t stop there. Wish me Luck! Thanks again Lashay…
If you want to get a work from home job make your resume sticks out and start with some of these tips. One easy and quick improvement you can make is to add a testimonial or two to your resume along with more specific skills and achievements. If you want the flexibility of being able to work from home, you may also want to brush up on your interview skills. Even though employers and hiring managers likely won't be able to meet you in person, they'll still want to interview you either over the phone or via video call. Check out these 5 successful tips for a great interview!
You’ll also need to be sure your workspace is comfortable. “A good strategy is to implement is a standing desk,” recommends Anthony Montenegro, Founder of The Blackmont Group. “Brands such as Varidesk even come as handy low-cost laptop versions. Taking intermittent standing breaks while continuing to labor productively at your desk can break the monotony of sitting all day.”
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