“I think the most important factor in successfully working from home is setting a boundary between work and personal time,” warns Russ Thornton, who runs Wealthcare for Women from his home. “Many jobs can suck up all your available time if you let them. When I “shut down” for the day, I shut off my computer, leave my office, and only very rarely do I set foot back in my office before I start work the next morning.”
#1- Accounting – Accountants are in charge of managing finances for companies or individuals. They make sure business numbers match up and are in line with the law. It may be beneficial to become a CPA if you want to land a work from home accounting job. Being certified can help your chances of securing a position. This can open up the door for doing taxes as well. Doing taxes virtually is something that can easily be done through emails. You can be there to provide answers to any financial questions a business may have.
As the new coronavirus continues its romp around the globe, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended “social distancing” as one way to combat the spread of disease. So far in the United States, that’s meant the canceling of conferences like Facebook's F8 and anticipatory Costco raids by Covid-19 preppers. Companies like Twitter and Square—which share Jack Dorsey as CEO—have now taken the next logical step of asking employees to work from home whenever possible, and more could potentially follow their lead. As someone who has worked remotely for nearly a decade, I am here to tell you: It's not easy. But setting some boundaries will go a long way toward keeping you sane.
Look, you’re going to snack. Constantly. It’s something to do! Why type when you can chomp? That walk to the pantry or snack drawer is the perfect procrastination. The best I can do is to encourage you to keep something remotely healthy on hand—baby carrot crunch is a satisfying stress reliever—so that when you do finish off a bag of something in one sitting, it’s not, like, Guy Fieri's Double Salt Fajita Pringles or whatever.
If you want to get a work from home job make your resume sticks out and start with some of these tips. One easy and quick improvement you can make is to add a testimonial or two to your resume along with more specific skills and achievements. If you want the flexibility of being able to work from home, you may also want to brush up on your interview skills. Even though employers and hiring managers likely won't be able to meet you in person, they'll still want to interview you either over the phone or via video call. Check out these 5 successful tips for a great interview!
Williams-Sonoma moved up a notch from the #11 position in 2019 to make the top 10 for 2020. This is an interesting entry as well, since Williams-Sonoma is a well-known retailer, focusing on the sale of kitchen and cookware supplies. But the company does offer remote positions, and as an employee you’ll be eligible for benefits, including health insurance, participation in the 401(k) plan, and paid vacation.

So! If your employer has asked you to stay home, here are some strategies for keeping it together, gleaned from someone who’s been doing it since “slack” was mostly a verb. Note: This is not a guide to responsible prepping, washing your hands, or scavenging Purell, although by all means do those things. It's mostly a reminder to draw bright lines between work and the rest of your life. It also draws on my own experience, so it hopefully goes without saying that your mileage may vary.


Sorry. Unless you work in an office that already has CNN or CNBC or whatever on all day in the corner, no television. You are not as good at working with that background noise as you think. And that one little break to catch up on Better Call Saul will invariably turn into a binge. This applies to videogames, books—anything but music, really. Basically, if you wouldn’t do it at the office, don’t do it at home when you’re working. Boundaries! 
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